Vint Cerf

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Vint Cerf
Vice President and Chief Internet Evangelist, Google

Widely known as a “Father of the Internet,” Vint Cerf is the co-designer of the TCP/IP protocols and the architecture of the Internet. President Bill Clinton presented the U.S. National Medal of Technology and President George W. Bush the Presidential Medal of Freedom to Cerf and his colleague, Robert E. Kahn, for founding and developing the Internet. Vint Cerf is also the recipient of the Turing Award, the Marconi Prize and a member in the National Academy of Engineering. With a life-long dedication to promoting the Internet and its accessibility to persons with disabilities, Vint Cerf, as Google’s Chief Internet Evangelist, is well-known for his visionary predictions on the evolution of technology and its impact on society. His many advocacy engagements have included serving as a trustee of Gallaudet University, a member of the United Nations Broadband Commission, and founding President of the Internet Society. Cerf helped to establish ICANN, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers and served as its chairman for eight years. Prior to Google, Vint Cerf served as a Faculty member at Stanford University, and in different engineering and executive capacities at DARPA, IBM, the Corporation for National Research Initiatives and MCI. Vint Cerf says that his experience of hearing loss reinforced his interest in developing the Internet: while at UCLA for his Ph.D., Vint Cerf got involved in the ARPANET project and took a personal interest in the idea of networked electronic mail, which was hugely attractive to him because it replaced uncertain voice calls with the clarity of text. With a firm belief that there is no excuse for making products that are not accessible, Vint Cerf remains a passionate advocate for digital accessibility.